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Cuilcagh Mountain Park

Florencecourt,

Description

Cuilcagh is a well-established location for hillwalkers with a network of trails that lead you in and around Cuilcagh Mountain Park. If reaching the summit is not for you, venturing some way into the park using one of the walking routes through the townlands of Gortmaconnell, Legg or Legacurragh will give you a taste of the beauty that can be found there.
The site consists of nearly 300 hectares of internationally important habitats and species as well as offering a chance to explore one of the few areas of wilderness that can be found in Northern Ireland. With geological features, such as the volcanic Cuilcagh Dyke, Monastir Gorge and the imposing cliffs of the mountain itself it is one of the most impressive areas within the Geopark.

Meadow pipits, skylarks and hen harriers occur in this area while golden plover breed in small numbers on the bog. The steep north-facing scarp below the summit plateau itself, have arctic-apline plants: starry saxifrage, three species of clubmoss, and mountain willow. Foxes and Irish hares are frequently seen and in winter snow buntings have been recorded.

The Cuilcagh Way is a waymarked 20 miles/33km route that traverses much of the park, stretching from the Cladagh Glen to the Summit of Cuilcagh Mountain and on down into Florencecourt Forest. The popular Legnabrocky Trail, which will bring you to the summit and back along the Cuilcagh Mountain boardwalk offers stunning views across the blanket bog, the Glencar Valley and the lakelands of Fermanagh and Cavan. It is a linear walk that begins near the entrance to the Marble Arch Caves and traverses the limestone grassland, blanket bog, and mountain plateau for 7.4km (15km round trip) and takes around 5 hours. It is a strenuous walk and those undertaking it should be well prepared with warm clothing, walking boots, food and water, map, compass and a mobile phone. The summit of the mountain has incredibly changeable weather and is not to be underestimated.
For more information on Cuilcagh Mountain Park, walking routes, education and events visit the Marble Arch Caves UNESCO Global Geopark website.
There is an interpretative exhibition housed in the Marble Arch Caves Visitors Centre. Open 7 days a week Mar – end Sept and by appointment during office hours outside these dates. Facilities/services include education service, including guided field studies, exhibition, audiovisual presentation, Geopark corner, cafe, picnic sites and car parking. Cuilcagh Mountain Park is open all year.
Please be aware that for the safety of visitors and that of the landscapes there are a number of restrictions that have been put in place. For example, there are no dogs allowed within Cuilcagh Mountain Park, this is purely on the grounds of livestock and wildlife safety but also for the safety of visitors. The other restrictions are outlined on the Marble Arch Caves Global Geopark website.

The site consists of nearly 300 hectares of internationally important habitats and species as well as offering a chance to explore one of the few areas of wilderness that can be found in Northern Ireland. With geological features, such as the volcanic Cuilcagh Dyke, Monastir Gorge and the imposing cliffs of the mountain itself it is one of the most impressive areas within the Geopark.

Meadow pipits, skylarks and hen harriers occur in this area while golden plover breed in small numbers on the bog. The steep north-facing scarp below the summit plateau itself, have arctic-apline plants: starry saxifrage, three species of clubmoss, and mountain willow. Foxes and Irish hares are frequently seen and in winter snow buntings have been recorded.

The Cuilcagh Way is a waymarked 20 miles/33km route that traverses much of the park, stretching from the Cladagh Glen to the Summit of Cuilcagh Mountain and on down into Florencecourt Forest. The popular Legnabrocky Trail, which will bring you to the summit and back along the Cuilcagh Mountain boardwalk offers stunning views across the blanket bog, the Glencar Valley and the lakelands of Fermanagh and Cavan. It is a linear walk that begins near the entrance to the Marble Arch Caves and traverses the limestone grassland, blanket bog, and mountain plateau for 7.4km (15km round trip) and takes around 5 hours. It is a strenuous walk and those undertaking it should be well prepared with warm clothing, walking boots, food and water, map, compass and a mobile phone. The summit of the mountain has incredibly changeable weather and is not to be underestimated.

For more information on Cuilcagh Mountain Park, walking routes, education and events visit the Marble Arch Caves UNESCO Global Geopark website.

There is an interpretative exhibition housed in the Marble Arch Caves Visitors Centre. Open 7 days a week Mar – end Sept and by appointment during office hours outside these dates. Facilities/services include education service, including guided field studies, exhibition, audiovisual presentation, Geopark corner, cafe, picnic sites and car parking. Cuilcagh Mountain Park is open all year.
Please be aware that for the safety of visitors and that of the landscapes there are a number of restrictions that have been put in place. For example, there are no dogs allowed within Cuilcagh Mountain Park, this is purely on the grounds of livestock and wildlife safety but also for the safety of visitors. The other restrictions are outlined on the Marble Arch Caves Global Geopark website.

Contact details

Marble Arch Caves UNESCO Global Geopark, 43 Marlbank Road, Legnabrocky, Florencecourt
Enniskillen
Co. Fermanagh
BT92 1EW
Tel: (028) 6634 8855
Email: mac@fermanaghomagh.com
Web: www.marblearchcavesgeopark.com

Opening times:

Open all year round

Prices:

Free

NB. As we do not have exact location information, this is a map of the local area.